Counting Down The 10 Biggest Credibility Mistakes – #8

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Counting Down The 10 Biggest Credibility Mistakes – #8

Encourager-In-Chief: October 10, 2018

This week begins another series of blogs. This one is specifically geared to solving the problems associated with maintaining credibility in your business setting.

#8: Inviting someone over tentatively and never confirming your plans

My wife and I used to be very close friends with another couple. We socialized with them at movies, parties, and general get-togethers. However, one problem we faced was that we couldn’t always depend on them. If they said they would show up for a party or event, we were never really sure if they would actually show.

In one particular instance, the husband mentioned that he was planning to have a bunch of people over on Christmas day. He said they might make a ham and indicated that if he did, we would be invited. However, he failed to ever formally invite us. We did not want to be forward and call up and ask, “are you making a Christmas dinner and are we invited?” Instead, we waited to hear from him.

About 5 o’clock on Christmas day, he called the house to ask if we were coming over. I explained that since we hadn’t heard from him, we had already eaten and we were staying in for the rest of the evening. It created an awkward feeling on both sides. The relationship was never really the same after that.

If you are planning to invite people to an event, be sure that they know for certain they are invited. Not only did we not go to our friend's house, we also did not make other arrangements to go anywhere else, presuming at some point that he would be giving us a call to spend Christmas day with him and his family.

Being a good host starts with the invitation. Don’t hang other people up or leave them in doubt of your plans. Make it clear and timely that you’re asking. Practice clear communication and you will be doing both of you a favor. It will go a long way to preserving good relations.

“Always over-communicate. Never under-communicate.” -- Don Hutson

This excerpt is taken from my Focus, Follow Up, and Follow Through seminar.  I encourage you to order my book, Moving Toward Mastery.